Bridge Builders

18 May 2018

With the introduction of our conflict resolution program, ‘Bridge Builders’ in the Junior Years, I have been reading articles looking at the impacts of intervention programs on the change to mental health, well-being and anxiety in children.

In a recent article, parenting expert Michael Grose discussed the topic of exposing children to safe challenges and the impact that this has on promoting better mental health and resilience in them.

Two studies were referred to in this article one from Beyond Blue looking at children’s well-being and the other from Macquarie University- a long-term study looking at children’s mental health.

These studies found conclusively, that young people who were able to talk about their emotions and those who were exposed to failure and loss at a young age, had much better skills in dealing with challenges in their lives as they grew into adolescence. Children who were exposed to safe risks were happier and much less anxious when dealing with failure or rejection from their peers.

It is recognised that children do need to experience failure in a safe and supportive environment such as they have at Glennie, where they are taught strategies to support them on their learning journey.

Research from Macquarie University indicates that one in six children and teenagers are experiencing anxiety on a regular basis, so the more we can do to support their mental resilience, the better they will be as they get older.

Michael Grose suggests five strategies which are straightforward and easy for all children and families to adopt.

  • The need for children to spend physical time with other children- not just in an online way! When children play without adult intervention, they create their own games and rules for these. Yes, from time to time there will be disagreements as to the “rules”, but in most instances, they will problem solve and work out solutions for themselves. The Victorian Education Department has encouraged “Pod Play” with younger children - a shed full of recyclables that can become whatever the children want them to be; encouraging creativity and language development, but at the same time, the valuable skills of team building, problem solving, negotiation and resolution of differing opinions and ideas. The results have been very positive with fewer issues being identified in the older year levels who also want to be involved! It is acknowledged that there are times when adults need to intervene and offer support and guidance- the key is not to solve the problems for them, but to give the guidance and intervention needed at that time.
  • Being a good loser and a gracious winner- There has been a big push in recent years to make everyone a winner, particularly on the sporting field and whilst this might be ok at a very young age, once children get to the end of early childhood years, there need to be opportunities for children to realise that loss and failure happen and that this is ok and a normal part of life. This helps to not only build resilience over the disappointment, but also confidence building from the satisfaction that comes with winning - when it happens. I have often said to the older girls you go into a competition prepared to do your best and to try to win, that’s what competitions are about, but when you don’t, you lose graciously and congratulate those who did. There are many other times when events are just for fun and that’s different.
  • Encourage children to talk about their feelings and emotions- Children need to be comfortable with the uncomfortable- unpleasant feelings such as disappointment, nervousness, and loss need to be experienced as they grow and learn. This can be hard for adults and especially parents, as we never want to see our children “hurting.” Sometimes, our reaction can escalate these feelings in the children, rather than diffuse them and it’s important that we listen, acknowledge that we understand and that their feelings are ok, and support without carrying their problems totally ourselves. When we enable children to verbalise their feelings to us, it helps them to process and make sense of them. Sometimes too, they need to understand that there are behaviours associated with these feelings that we won’t tolerate as adults!
  • Model calm and rational thinking- we need to remember that high emotions can be contagious and we can feel the same way as the child when they are angry or upset. As adults, we need to manage our responses and emotions so that we can provide effective and empathetic responses and support.     
  • One of the first lessons in Bridge Builders has involved teaching children how to take a deep breath and regain control and a sense of calm. Once calm, we can then help them to logically think their way through the situation and avoid catastrophising and letting things get out of control. Adults who model calm behaviours, when faced with stress, show children how to respond in a safe and effective manner, rather than reacting at an emotional level.
  • Encourage children to become independent problem solvers- If adults continually solve problems for children, they reinforce the child’s sense of dependency and they can start to feel worried about taking risks, through fear of making mistakes and may blame themselves for not being good enough. 

When as adults, we are presented with a routine problem, eg they left their musical instrument at home or have forgotten lunch or sports gear, step back and get them to provide a solution. The children need to know that growing up increases their level of responsibility and that they need to develop the skills they need to manage challenging situations which will present as they get older.  

We don’t, however, want to deter them from talking with us about bigger issues and problems, so there is a line to be drawn and a close understanding of when to seek help and when they should be able to manage it for themselves.

So, if we as teachers, and you as parents, work to provide them with these skills and strategies, they will soon be able to navigate all manner of challenges and issues knowing they are supported, yet not over-protected.

We have a great parenting library in the Junior Years which is available to all Glennie families. Please feel free to borrow any of these practical resources.

Source: Parenting Ideas Michael Grose.Child Development and Parenting advice 2018

Mr Steve Warren
Head of Junior Years

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Teaching Assertiveness

18 May 2018

As our girls grow through their teen years, it can be difficult to navigate how they speak to others. At times, when they try to express their views or express how they feel, they can come across as aggressive, but as they grow older and begin to see the wider perspective of the relationships they have, they learn that respect is paramount in all communication.

At a recent conference, it became apparent to me that many teenage girls are not challenging what they see around them, even if they think that it is not acceptable. They are demonstrating passive compliance - doing and accepting things with which they do not agree.

Our girls need to practise assertiveness. In many circles, they are excellent at expressing themselves, but this can become more difficult when applied to relationships because of the perceived social impact.

Assertive communication is a skill that needs to be learned. Our culture sometimes tends to reward aggression. Putdowns are framed as humour in cartoons and sitcoms, and the internet can be a platform for bullying. It’s hard to find examples of assertiveness in the public sphere. That’s why teachers and parents need to explicitly teach assertiveness, so students internalise skills and use them in everyday situations.

Kristin Stuart Valdes suggests some techniques in her article 'Modeling Assertiveness with Students' (Edutopia, 2018).

The “nice no” – When a student feels pressured to go along with other people’s ideas or invitations (“Do you want to trade lunches?”), it can be effective to say, “No, thanks” or “Thanks for asking, but not today.”

Setting a boundary and holding to it – When asked to do something outside your comfort zone (“Can I copy off your paper?”), it’s effective to say, “No, I’m not comfortable with that” and not feel compelled to give reasons.

Asking for some thinking time – When asked for something and you’re not ready to answer, an assertive response is to say, “I’m not sure how to answer that right now. Can I get back to you later today?” Ask for the amount of time you need to get more information, weigh other options, and reflect on your feelings about the situation.

Stating your needs – It may seem that others are ignoring or disrespecting your needs when the problem is that you actually haven’t articulated them clearly enough. For example, a student might say to a teacher, “Could you please repeat that? I need to hear the directions again”.

Using an “I feel” message – This may be the best way to communicate your feelings and emotional needs, so others have a chance to understand – for example, saying to a friend, “I feel sad when you cancel our plans because I love hanging out with you.”

Responding to aggression – Sometimes an assertive statement is met with an aggressive response. A good next step is to calmly remove yourself from the conversation, saying, “I think I communicated my thoughts clearly, so there’s not much more to talk about.”

Being assertive allows us to show integrity by standing up for what we believe in while being respectful in our communication with others. Girls, let's stand up for what we believe in and ensure that the world around us reflects our values.

Mrs Jo Matherson
Deputy Principal

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It's not your fault; your phone is designed to be addictive.

4 May 2018

On Wednesday during our Student Activities session, Mr Tim Causer held a discussion with our Year 8 students around the topic of mobile phone usage. We believe this content to be worthwhile to all girls and parents.

The beginning of this video was used as the stimulus. A discussion ensued:

  • the social problem caused by mobile usage - http://humanetech.com/problem/
  • the design features that made them addictive
  • things the user can do to fight back - http://humanetech.com/take-control/
  • how to aid yourself to have the self-control desired
  • what healthy social interaction/phone usage looks like
  • the manipulative practices of companies like Facebook 

Some examples of the discussion points about how apps are addictive:

  • Apps contain many of the same characteristics as gambling slot machines with similar sounds, lights and even interactions like scrolling or lever pulling to load content
  • Autoplay feature doesn’t have an endpoint thus we are more likely to continue watching despite not being any more satisfied
  • Less control as our content is delivered to us continuously, such as via autoplay or apps which have infinite scrolling

Some examples of the discussion points about how to reduce phone addiction:

  • Change the colour scheme of your phone to make it less appealing to look at, greyscale your screen. AndroidiDevice
  • Turn off non-human notifications
  • Receive notifications in batches at set points during the day rather than continuously
  • Restrict your home screen to apps which have practical/ everyday value, i.e. calendar, clock, weather, Uber
  • Filter out apps which have infinite scrolling and numerous notifications, i.e. Instagram, Facebook. This is easy on Android, hard on iOS - put in folders on other screens is an interim step
  • Make conscious decisions about what things are worthy of your attention
  • Use self-control apps/extensions on both phone and laptop to block websites and monitor usage (wastage) time

The discussion also centred around home rules:

  • devices out of bedrooms for night time,
  • using light settings towards sleep time, 
  • DO NOT DISTURB mode overnight (and during class)

The girls participated whole-heartedly in this vibrant discussion and are aware of many of the issues; however, the challenge is for them to have the courage to take these steps. Girls were prompted to discuss the content with parents and to invite their parents to also live in the moment, not in social media.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns about this content, please contact Mr Tim Causer causert@glennie.qld.edu.au or me bladesj@glennie.qld.edu.au.

Mrs Jodi Blades, Dean of Students
Mr Tim Causer, e-Learning Co-ordinator    

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Wellbeing Initiative

27 April 2018

As educators, we are concerned about the growing rates of anxiety and depression evident in students, whereby mental illness is the greatest disease burden for young people (World Health Organisation, 2017). There is growing recognition that schools play a key role in the treatment, prevention and promotion of youth mental health. Furthermore, evidence suggests that wellbeing supports academic growth and accomplishment. In fact, wellbeing and academic performance go hand-in-hand.

There is a multitude of definitions of wellbeing. However, Professor Seligman (2011) defines wellbeing in terms of high levels of PERMA: positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment. At its core, wellbeing is the combination of feeling good and functioning well.

Adolescents today face complex challenges with the rapid development of technology, social media use, evolving economic climate, urbanisation, educational demands and unique biological and psychological maturation processes. In order to support and empower our young women to thrive and flourish in this evolving society, we need to measure and monitor their wellbeing so that we have a deeper understanding of their strengths, challenges and needs. Therefore, we have engaged a research team from the Centre for Positive Psychology at The University of Melbourne to measure the wellbeing of our students in Years 7-12, which will, in turn, inform a whole school approach to wellbeing.

An email was sent to all Middle and Senior Years parents earlier this week informing you of this wellbeing initiative and seeking your permission to allow your daughter(s) to participate in the wellbeing survey that will be completed during school hours. I urge you to provide consent for your daughter(s) to participate in the survey by please responding YES or NO on the digital consent form by Friday 4 May 2018.

If you have more than one daughter in Years 7-12, this digital consent form allows you to indicate consent for all of your children at once. The survey is anonymous and the responses are strictly confidential and only group results will be reported back to the school.

Further information about the survey can be found in the attached Parent/Carer Plain Language Statement and the Student Plain Language Statement that will be shown to your daughter(s) before commencing the survey, should she have consent to participate. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about your daughter’s participation in this wellbeing initiative.  

Mrs Jodi Blades
Dean of Students

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Results, Reports and Assessment

27 April 2018

Term 1 results for Years 7 – 12 and progressive reports for Years 7 – 10

As the lovely expression goes, one of the best ways to boost student learning is by providing ‘dollops and dollops’ of appropriate feedback relative to students’ learning goals.

One way we have been doing this – and making it visible to parents at Glennie in the Middle and Senior Years - is by progressive reporting. I am pleased to let you know that cross marking has been completed and results as well as feedback for Term 1 assessment items are now available in SEQTA.

To access these results and comments, please select the Assessment tab in the SEQTA Engage menu on the left of the Portal. Select the subject you wish to see, then click on each assessment item to see the results and teacher feedback.

Years 7 – 12 Assessment Information

Assessment dates for Term Two are also finalised for Years 7 – 12. To locate your daughter’s assessment information, please select the Assessment tab in the SEQTA Engage menu and select Upcoming. You can personalise your view by selecting either “cards” or “list”.

The information listed on this page is your daughter’s personalised exam and non-exam block assessment items for Term 2. If you feel an item is missing, please contact your daughter’s teacher. All assessment information has been reviewed.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Dean of Teaching and Learning

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The Learning Hub – Term 2 2018

20 April 2018

Continuing with our goal to create independent and autonomous learners, the Learning Hub returns in Term 2 with an emphasis on developing effective study habits and writing skills. Students can attend sessions related to effective note-taking, applying spaced learning techniques and using flash cards effectually.

The Learning Hub also continues to be a space where students can get together with other students and teachers to solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate and brainstorm ideas and concepts. Students in Years 7 – 12 are encouraged to use the Hub to work collaboratively, share skills and knowledge, and deepen their understanding of their coursework.

Opening hours for The Learning Hub as well as the timetable of sessions for Term 2 have been published to students via Tutor Groups and in the Student Handbook. A copy of the timetable is available here.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Dean of Teaching and Learning

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A Message from Mr Warren

22 March 2018

Headlights
The end of Term 1 is always exciting for the Junior Years children from  K-6 who, after counting the last few “sleeps”, have the opportunity to share their day with their grandparents; showing them their classrooms, introducing their friends and joining with them in various activities in and out of the classroom.

Well over four hundred grandparents and ‘adopted special guests’ joined us for one of three special days across the Kindergarten and Junior Years. The grandparents too, enjoy the opportunity to come back to school and share some special moments and record others for reminiscing over later.

Each year, I highlight to them the important role that they play in the lives of their special children. This role has in most instances, increased over the last few years, as more and more families have both parents working to make ends meet and grandparents taking on the role of caring for their children’s children on a more regular basis. The Census held in 2011, found that grandparents are the biggest providers of informal child care for children between birth and 12 years,  particularly babies and toddlers while their parents are in the workforce or studying (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011).

I don’t yet have my own grandchildren, but can only imagine what a special time it is when the first grandchild is born and you can be actively involved in the child’s growth and development. Time to spend with them listening, observing and attending to the smaller things for which busy parents do not have the time.

Grandparents can reflect and pass on to their grandchildren cultural knowledge as well as family and community traditions, building a sense of belonging and connectedness to the past. Research has shown that hearing stories about family members overcoming hardship can actually help children become less discouraged when they face hardships - such an important life skill for them all. When they tell stories to their grandchildren, it assists in making them more real in the lives of the children.

Traditions, too, help children feel secure, give them a sense of family identity and let them know that they are a part of something larger than themselves. New traditions are often created during these times together.

Grandparents are also great at teaching basic skills and often have more patience with their grandchildren than perhaps they had with their own children! For many, growing up in a less mechanized time, means they have skills that some parents lack and because of their concern for their grandchildren, they will teach these skills safely. Skills such as sewing, knitting, gardening, small repairs, carpentry, cooking and baking are just a few.

From a very young age we can teach the children to set a table, sew on a button, pump up bicycle tyres, fold towels, tighten screws and hammer in a nail or to use simple hand tools. Older grandchildren can be taught more complex tasks, especially around their particular interests.

Grandparents understand so well that life is full of ups and downs, we all falter and fall, and it is at those times we need a little extra love and support. A close relationship with grandparents helps grandchildren grow in confidence and realise that mistakes and failures are a very important to growth and a normal part of life, helping  them maintain a sense of self worth and sense of security.

So, we salute you and thank you for what you do! Keep being involved!

What children need most are the essentials that grandparents provide in abundance. They give unconditional love, kindness, patience, humour, comfort, lessons in life. And, most importantly, cookies. ~ Rudy Giuliani

An hour with your grandchildren can make you feel young again. Anything longer than that, and you start to age quickly. ~ Gene Perret

My grandkids believe I’m the oldest thing in the world. And after two or three hours with them, I believe it, too. ~ Gene Perret

A full gallery of photos from today's Grandparents' Day and Ballgames Carnival will be featured in the first eNews of the new term.

Happy Easter!

Mr Steve Warren
Head of Junior Years

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Baton Relay

22 March 2018

The Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Queen’s Baton Relay promises to be an exciting event for Glennie as it will be travelling through Newtown on Wednesday 28 March. While it is during the holidays, it would be wonderful to have you and your son or daughter support this event by lining the footpath along Herries Street, with Glennie students in uniform please.

Our very own Anthea Moodie (Sport Captain, 2017) is set to receive the baton outside Glennie at 3:19pm, with Glennie parent Eliza Whiteside also in the baton relay at 2.45pm along Holberton Street. We have been advised to be here by 3:00pm to be sure not to miss it. The participants will be stopping and regrouping outside Glennie, so that is quite exciting.

There will be temporary road closures in the area to enable the community to safely view the QBR. Parking will be available in our western carpark or the Chapel area and pool carpark. Street parking will be very limited due to restrictions imposed.

This could be a once in a lifetime opportunity for many of our students, especially being so close to the action! You may find this interactive map interesting as it outlines the Toowoomba routes and the list of baton bearers:  

Exciting times indeed.

Ms Jodi Blades
Dean of Students

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Teaching how to cope with disappointment

16 March 2018

As the assessment period draws to a close and students await their results, you as parents can help to prepare your daughter so that she can gain the most out of an assessment period. Too often, we focus on the result and praise or chastise our children accordingly. The first thing we should focus on is the effort each student has put into preparing and completing their assessment task. If the effort is in any way lacking then, that should be the focus of any conversation about the result - good or bad, not the result itself. Some students can achieve reasonable results with minimal effort up to a point, but as they progress through the Middle and Senior Years, the chances of this quickly diminish.

There are times when a hard-working student does not receive the result they were expecting, and they can feel extremely disappointed. It is important that the girls learn from this experience and gain skills in dealing with this. Now is the time to try some of the suggestions below to assist your daughter in dealing with disappointment in the future - after all, it is a part of life.

  •  Help your children identify the emotions they feel and express them in an acceptable way. Keep a clear head yourself. Sometimes you can get emotional too, and logic goes out the window. The simple act of remaining calm will defuse some of your child's negative feelings.
  • Give them an opportunity to talk about why they think things didn’t go the way they expected them to go. This way they can get it out of their system especially if you just quietly listen without criticising or jumping in with solutions. Venting to a trusted adult can be a helpful release.
  • Celebrate having a go as if it were a win. Give as much praise for having a go as you would do for winning. Reinforce the message that winning isn't always the most important thing – what’s important is the effort you put in, your positive attitude, and the fact that you can learn from everything and should keep on trying are equally important life lessons.
  • Children watch how you respond to failures in your own life. It's helpful sometimes to share your disappointment and show them how you learn from the experience.
  • Learning to lose at something with grace will eventually help your child develop into a more resilient person in life. Congratulate them on handling a setback so well.
  • Teach self-calming skills. This may be going outside to kick a ball, listening to upbeat music, taking a deep breath, having a chat, using positive self-talk, reading a book, getting a hug, watching a funny movie, going for a walk. Give suggestions if your child is little or provide a diversion, but by the time they are 7 or 8, they should be able to figure out for themselves what helps them calm down and move on.

Mrs Jo Matherson
Deputy Principal

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Bullying, No Way!

16 March 2018

Today as we celebrate the National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence (NDA), around two million students from 4,575 Australian schools stand united to send a powerful message that bullying and violence are never okay. The National Day of Action is Australia’s key anti-bullying event for schools and in 2018, schools are called to imagine a world free from bullying. The Glennie School is an official NDA school and yesterday at our Middle Years Assembly, we highlighted authentic student voice when our Year 12 student Hanna Hayes shared her own positive messages (see principal’s message for Hana's speech). Engaging young people with powerful messages is really important to us.

This week during Tutor time, students opened up the conversation, generated ideas and spoke about positive action to address bullying. Each Tutor group presented a slide in response to this year’s theme, Imagine a world free from bullying, which was presented during Assembly yesterday.  

Girls in Years 4 to 6 participated in an interactive online session, Imagine a future free from cyberbullying, which was conducted by the Office of the ESafety Commissioner for all Anglican Schools in Queensland.

It’s fantastic that students from The Glennie School are getting involved in the National Day as it is a positive day of action, bringing school communities together to help find workable solutions that address bullying and violence, and to share one powerful message: Bullying. No Way! Let’s take a stand together.

Website

Resources for Parents

Mrs Jodi Blades
Dean of Students

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Everyone’s Learning

9 March 2018

Throughout this term, staff have undertaken professional development activities to reflect on their teaching practices and prepare quality educational programs and pedagogical practices. These will continue to enhance the learning environments for the girls.

Teachers in the Middle and Senior Years are undertaking QCAA (Queensland Curriculum and Assessment Authority) modules that quality assure teacher skills in leading the development of student assessment and verify student results. These modules require both group discussion and individual testing (with an 80% pass mark).

We encourage the girls to use these same strategies for revising for exams and checking their understanding. Working together supports one another, builds shared and common understanding.

“Education is not the learning of facts, but training the mind to think” - Albert Einstein

10 Amazing Life Lessons from Albert Einstein.

  • Follow your curiosity
  • Perseverance is priceless
  • Focus on the present
  • The imagination is powerful
  • Make mistakes
  • Live in the moment
  • Create value
  • Don’t be repetitive
  • Knowledge comes from experience
  • Learn the rules and then play better.

All the very best to the girls and staff in their assessments.

Mr Russell Baldock
Associate Dean of Staff

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From the Deputy Principal

2 March 2018

Recently, I read an article by John Rosemond that he wrote after asking parents who the most important person in their family was. The overwhelming response was 'Our kids!' He goes on to challenge this response asking why parents have given their children that status in the family.

He suggests to parents that their children exist because of their relationship and they thrive because they have created a stable family. It is the parents who provide nutritious meals and work hard to educate their children, provide them with nice clothes and enjoy great holidays. For this generation, living in Australia, our children live relatively carefree lives compared with children in other countries or children of previous generations.

When people of my age were growing up (in the fashion deprived 1980s) social, and family etiquette demanded that children waited until adults had finished speaking and they were not allowed to interrupt. We looked up to adults, knowing that one day we would be one and our turn would come. There was a respected hierarchy and children were less important than adults. The weekly calendar included family time and community events and did not rotate solely around the children's' activities. Adult time was a high priority.

It is essential to nurture our adult relationships and ensure we spend time with those who support us, strengthening the relationship, while our children respectfully watch on, not interrupting or demanding our time. Although our children may not realise it, it is the modelled behaviour of a supportive network of adults that demonstrates to them the values of that community.

John finishes his article with the following reflection. 'The most important thing about children is the need to prepare them properly for responsible citizenship. The primary objective should not be raising a straight-A student who excels at three sports, earns a spot on the Olympic swim team, goes to an A-list university and becomes a prominent brain surgeon. The primary objective is to raise a child such that community and culture are strengthened.'

Mrs Jo Matherson
Deputy Principal

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From the Dean of Students

2 March 2018

This week during the Activities Program, we focused on our four core values.

Integrity: be truthful and sincere; ensure consistency between what we say and what we do and what we believe and how we behave.

Respect: be respectful of ourselves and treat others with courtesy, dignity and positive regard; we honour the rights of others and we respect our school, environment and our world.

Compassion: be sensitive to the needs of others; be supportive and nurture those less fortunate than ourselves and treat each other as we wish to be treated.

Courage: be positive as we continue to strive to improve as individuals; be resilient and forward-thinking despite adversity or challenge; perseverance, effort and a growth mindset can help us individually and as a team, for the benefit of ourselves and our community.

Last week during a special ceremony, each House Captain drew a ‘value’ out of a hat, which then became their focus for this week’s House time.

  • Donaldson focused on compassion.
  • Hale focussed on courage.
  • Tufnell focused on integrity.
  • Webber focussed on respect.

The House Committees, with the help of the Heads of House, planned and organised a series of interactive activities and fun games designed to reinforce the meaning and importance of our core values. These included the creation of role plays and/or a dance illustrating each value, mindfulness colouring-in whilst listening to music and writing definitions, quotes, messages of compassion, integrity, respect and courage, identifying people they respect, having the courage to complete an obstacle course blindfolded, building bridges, acrostic poems of integrity, Chinese Whispers, team challenges, to name a few.

It was a wonderful opportunity in House time to focus on the core values that underpin all that we do at Glennie, as we endeavour to develop in each girl, the intellectual, physical and spiritual potential to be All She Can Be.

Click here to view the photo gallery.

Mrs Jodi Blades
Dean of Students

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From the Dean of Teaching and Learning

2 March 2018

Progressive Reporting

One of the School’s aims in moving towards a model of progressive reporting in the Middle and Senior Years was to provide timely and meaningful feedback to students and parents. So successful was the trial last year that all subjects in Years 7 – 10 will be involved in progressive reporting this year, as well as English and Drama in Years 11 & 12. By 2019, all subjects in the Middle and Senior Years will be reported on progressively.

Why?

The research on feedback practices is clear – teacher feedback is the most powerful single moderator that enhances student achievement. Effective feedback identifies what a student is doing well, the areas for improvement, and offers ideas and suggestions about how to improve. Effective feedback is clear, practical and encourages in students a growth, rather than a fixed, mindset.

What is progressive reporting?

As the name suggests, progressive reporting is the process of reporting continually. At Glennie, this involves results and teacher feedback at an individual assessment task level. This means students and parents have access to meaningful and targeted feedback regularly throughout the year, and in much more detail than the traditional summative comments in the end of semester report.

Progressive reporting allows students to regularly reflect on their progress, set learning goals, and make improvements during the year. Students have a clear picture of where they are and what they need to do in order to move to the next level. It also facilitates meaningful discussions between students, parents and teachers about the student’s learning and how they can be further supported or challenged.

Ultimately, progressive reporting shifts the focus of assessing for reporting to assessing for feedback, and this benefits everyone – students, parents and teachers.

What about Interim and Semester reports?

As we move towards a new system of senior assessment and tertiary entrance, our model of reporting needs to change. In 2018, the following reporting methods and periods will apply.

Years 7 – 10

Students will not receive interim reports because teachers will have provided ongoing written feedback about student progress throughout the year.

Students will receive an end of semester report containing a Tutor Teacher comment and overall subject results, but no subject comment, Again, student progress will have been reported on progressively throughout the year.

Years 11 & 12

Students in Years 11 & 12 will receive both an interim and end of semester report, as per previous years.

For a more detailed overview of our reporting periods for 2018, please see the table above.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Dean of Teaching and Learning

 

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Middle and Senior Years Academic Support

16 February 2018

 At Glennie, there is an extensive range of academic support opportunities for students in the Middle and Senior Years:

Students are encouraged to discuss any academic concern with their teacher outside of class time.
The Learning Hub – The tutoring timetable for Term 1 has been finalised, circulated to all Tutor Groups and published in the Student Handbook. A copy of the timetable has also been attached to this week’s edition of eNews.
Students in Years 7 – 9 can practise English, Mathematics, Science, Social Science and Languages skills and concepts via the program Education Perfect.
Students in Years 10 – 12 have access to Studiosity, which offers one-to-one, personal help in real time for English, Mathematics, Science and Business subjects.
Beginning this year, students have fortnightly study skills lessons.
Students in the Senior Years are encouraged to form subject study groups, to deepen their understanding of the course material.
As always, if students have an academic concern, they should see their teacher in the first instance, or the relevant Head of Department.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Dean of Teaching and Learning

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Celebrating 80 years of Andrews Cup

16 February 2018

The Andrews Cup sporting competition in which Glennie Junior girls from Years 2 to 6 participate, forms an important part of our sporting events calendar, along with our Interhouse and Friday afternoon sporting competitions. More formally known as the Queensland Girls Independent Primary Schools Sporting Association, QGIPSSA, leads into the Queensland Girls Secondary Schools Sporting Association, QGSSSA and provides a sporting program for girls who share a similar philosophy for sport.

This year, the Association celebrates its 80th anniversary and will commence with the Swimming competition, at Chandler, hosted by The Glennie School. Special pennants and ribbons have been designed for all events this year.

In 1938, the foundation year, there were many long established girls’ independent schools in Queensland, however, few had junior or primary grades.

Two sisters, Isabel (1898-1981) and Jessie (1910-2008) Andrews, both of whom were teachers at Somerville House, felt that young pupils who competed in Interform competitions, with the senior school, though very enthusiastic, were never going to be successful in sporting competitions.
They asked Miss Jarrett, Principal of the School if they might donate a trophy for sporting activities between Somerville House and sister school Clayfield College at the junior school level. Thus the Andrews Cup was born.

At the end of each year the Cup was awarded to the School which had achieved most points in the sports: swimming, athletics, ballgames, tennis, and basketball. By 1944, Moreton Bay College joined the competition; in 1962 St Aidan’s, St Hilda’s and St Margaret’s were added. Two further schools, Toowoomba Preparatory School (now Toowoomba Anglican College and Preparatory School) and The Glennie School joined later (1993) whilst Ipswich Junior Grammar School and Fairholme College became members in 2012.

Today, the range of sports in the Andrews Cup Program includes Swimming, Tennis, Touch Football, Cross Country, Netball, Athletics, Softball and Artistic Gymnastics. Basketball has been included as an invitational event as well.

With the girls interest in different sports changing, the Association is looking to the future with a new strategic plan being developed in 2018, which will investigate the sports on offer to ensure that it remains a relevant Association, as it moves towards its centenary and continues to work towards fulfilling the aim of encouraging girls to remain active in sport.

Mr Steve Warren
Head of Junior Years

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A Message from the Dean of Students

2 February 2018

What a wonderfully, warm and welcoming community Glennie is! A heartfelt thank-you to the many staff, students and parents who have been so kind, friendly and supportive as I find my feet in the new role as Dean of Students. I am looking forward to working with the Heads of House, Tutor teachers and all staff to develop and strengthen the School’s pastoral and wellbeing programs. Communication channels remain the same, so if a Middle and Senior Years student or parent has a concern about your daughter’s wellbeing, you are encouraged to contact the Tutor teacher initially and then the relevant Head of House. If you still have concerns, then please contact me.

Best wishes for a fabulous 2018.

Mrs Jodi Blades
Dean of Students

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A Message from the Deputy Principal

25 January 2018

I am excited about my new role as Deputy Principal and looking forward to becoming involved in the Junior Years and Senior Years again, as I was in my previous school. The singing in Junior Years assembly was just lovely and brought joy to all the adults there, and it will be wonderful to be a part of the Seniors final year of school.

All staff have missed the girls over the break, particularly those still at school, as the girls are the heart of our culture and the energy is lacking when they are not here. I hope they have returned refreshed and excited about what 2018 will hold for them. Their smiling faces and positive attitudes are great to see, and I hope they will try new things and not give up when it becomes difficult.

If your daughter is new to Glennie, I hope she feels like she is a part of our school very soon and that she is getting any help she needs. Please do not hesitate to contact her Tutor Teacher or class teacher with any concerns, no matter how small.

Mrs Jo Matherson
Deputy Principal

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A Message from the Head of Middle Years

24 November 2017

I love this time of year. It is full of energy, fun and a sense of relief now that assessments are over. Term 4 is a short and consequently busy term for all, but is the most rewarding. The end-of-year activities build house spirit and celebrate achievements, creating an atmosphere that has a buzz about it, and this is what the Glennie community spirit is all about; it is hard to describe to others that aren't a part of it.

I hope that your daughters have enjoyed the year and look forward to family time over the Christmas and New Year period. We look forward to them returning, recharged and refreshed and we hope you will have time to relax over the summer school holidays.

Mrs Jo Matherson
Head of Middle Years

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A Message from the Head of Senior Years

17 November 2017

What a week it has been for our Year 12 students! Together, they have celebrated the end of their time as a secondary school student through the Senior and House Picnics, the Mother-Daughter Breakfast, the Morning Tea in the Junior Years, the Father-Daughter Bowling, the Formal and the GOGA Mocktails. What a delight is has been to witness, at each event, girls’ thankfulness and recognition of the support they have received from parents, staff and other students over the course of their schooling journey. And so, it was with much excitement but also a bit of sadness, that we said farewell to our Seniors of 2017 on the oval after the “last blast” following the Valedictory Eucharist and Senior Graduation.

We will miss these wonderful girls who have shown outstanding leadership and have been an inspiration to the incoming Senior leaders of 2018.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Head of Senior Years

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Junior Years Carols

17 November 2017

Parents are reminded that the Junior Years Carols services will be held at St Luke’s Church this Sunday evening: Years K to 3 at 4.30pm and Years 4 to 6 at 5.30pm.

For the service for Kindergarten to Year 3, girls in Kindergarten, Prep, G Minor Choir, and the Bible and prayer readers are asked to be St Luke’s Hall by 4:00pm please. At the conclusion of the Kindy/Prep item, children are to be collected by their parents (from where they finish their item) and they sit with parents for the remainder of the service.

For the Service for Years 4 to 6, G Major Choir, String Ensemble, Dancing, Bible or Prayer Readers and the Tableau are to be at St Luke’s Hall by 4:45pm please. All others sit with their parents.

All children are expected to attend, please, in uniform. No hats are required. Other family members are most welcome to join us for these short services. There will be a collection of groceries for the St Luke’s parish larder. These may be left under the Christmas tree. Thank you in anticipation for your donation. If you have a daughter in both year level groups, you may choose which service you attend as a family, unless she has a specific role in one of the services.

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A Message from the Head of Junior Years

10 November 2017

Headlights
At 11am on 11 November 1918, the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years of continuous warfare. The allied armies had driven the German invaders back, having inflicted heavy defeats upon them over the preceding months.

In November, the Germans called for an armistice (suspension of fighting) in order to secure a peace settlement. They accepted the allied terms of unconditional surrender.

This first modern world conflict had involved over 70 million people and left between nine and thirteen million dead, perhaps as many as one-third of them with no known grave. The allied nations chose this day and time for the commemoration of their war dead.

After the end of the Second World War, the Australian and British governments changed the name to Remembrance Day. Armistice Day was no longer an appropriate title for a day which would commemorate all war dead.

In Australia on the 75th anniversary of the armistice in 1993 Remembrance Day ceremonies again became the focus of national attention. The remains of an unknown Australian soldier, exhumed from a First World War military cemetery in France, were ceremonially entombed in the Australian War Memorial's Hall of Memory.

This ceremony, which touched a chord across the Australian nation, re-established Remembrance Day as a significant day of commemoration to remember those who died or suffered for Australia's cause in all wars and armed conflicts.

Today in the Junior Years, we commemorated this event with a short service in the Assembly Hall focusing on the gallantry of John Simpson Kirkpatrick and I told the girls the story of this soldier and his special donkeys who gave the ultimate sacrifice for his fellow men and his country. One story of so many from the tragedy of war.

We will remember them - Lest we forget.

Mr Steve Warren
Head of Junior Years

Click here for a few photos of the Junior Years Remembrance Day Ceremony

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A Message from the Head of Senior Years

3 November 2017

This week, Year 12 students eagerly received their end of year arrangements sheet outlining all the special events and activities held during the week of their graduation. The sheet is a timely reminder that, for all students and staff, the time between now and Speech Day is just bursting with study, marking, cross-marking, results checking, report writing, excursions, functions, costume making, singing practices, letter and speech writing, textbook returns, locker clean-outs and multiple rehearsals for everything.

As we enter and navigate this four-week whirlwind, please take the time to look after and support each other. We all handle stress differently, and a little bit of kindness and compassion will go a long way towards supporting effective teaching and learning, connection and engagement, and motivation right up until Speech Day.

Ms Tonia Gloudemans
Head of Senior Years

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A Message from the Head of Middle Years

27 October 2017

With examinations, not too far away from completion and school winding down the girls are looking forward to the long holidays ahead. Not all have a job or activities planned, and many students are having to learn to manage their free time. This includes determining how much of it they will spend on their devices and, for all of us, it’s getting increasingly difficult to extricate those devices from our daily lives. Now, I know I have mentioned IT use recently but I find that professionally and personally (as I am the parent of four teenagers) IT misuse causes the most distress to 'tweens' and 'teens'.

Ana Homayoun, author of Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World, offers some valuable advice.

Instead of punishing our children or monitoring them 24/7, we should focus on healthy socialisation, effective self-regulation and safety - helping them to make positive choices and exercise freedom and responsibility.

HOW TO BUILD GOOD SOCIAL MEDIA HABITS

Check your child’s phone. Children should know you can ask for their phones and expect full access. While some parents take a hands-off approach because they want to respect their children’s privacy, it’s important to make the distinction between privacy and safety. 24-Hour access doesn’t mean 24-hour snooping. It means that a parent is still responsible for monitoring what a minor does online. It’s not just what they put out there; it’s also what they’re receiving. If you find something you don’t like, talk to your child about why you find it inappropriate — and then ask them what they think. Once they verbalise their thoughts, it allows them the opportunity to think things through and come up with their own set of values.

Be app-savvy. If your child is on it, you should be too. At least try it out so you can have informed conversations about it. If your children know that you understand the social media they're using, they’re more likely to come to you to talk about issues that arise.

Help children understand their ‘why’. Inspire children to act out of internal motivation instead of fear by helping them build their own filter. Encourage your children to ask themselves ‘Why am I picking up my phone? Am I bored, am I lonely, am I sad? Am I insecure?’ Or ‘Why am I posting this? Does this make me feel up or down?’ This helps them make decisions that reflect their own values and choices and separate their online experiences from real-life ones. Asking themselves why’ also slows down impulsive online communications, and encourages children to make smarter choices.

Set clear ground rules. Talk to your children about appropriate social media use before you give them a phone or allow them to download a new app. Clearly state rules and expectations, and stick with them as much as possible. This may include not putting anything online that you wouldn’t want your friends’ parents to read (because several of them will); getting permission before downloading a new app; and checking phones into parents at bedtime.

Do a digital detox. Learn to be okay with being offline. Parents can start by modelling that behaviour: no phones at the dinner table, for example, or no checking texts while you’re talking with your child. And while most children won’t admit it to their parents, when parents put restrictions on how much and when children can use technology, it can be a relief.

Mrs Jo Matherson
Head of Middle Years

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A Message from the Head of Junior Years

20 October 2017

When you are travelling with a group of girls for a week, one soon gets to know them well. There are many differences within a cohort of Glennie girls, (and yes, like all students, they have their moments!), but there are some traits that seem to remain year in year out at Glennie. I refer to the way our girls present themselves when out within the community and their ability to be themselves, and yet present in a manner which makes them noticed by others - but in the nicest of ways!

Last week in Sydney and Canberra, we were approached by so many members of the community to say how well the girls behaved; their courtesy towards others, both within their own group and outside of it and also in the way they presented themselves in their uniform- wearing it with pride. Watching them standing with such respect in the Hall of Memory at the Australian War Memorial and laying a wreath on the tomb of the Unknown Soldier really brings a lump to your throat, not only because of the solemnity of the occasion, but also due to the way the girls conduct themselves during this ceremony.

No more than we would expect really and yet sadly, we seem to stand out as being an exception to the rule. Both parents and the teachers should share in the credit here. Compliments were given from our first flight to the last. At various attractions, girls were given those extra little privileges just because of the way in which they presented themselves. An example was on a cruise around Lake Burley Griffin, where under guidance from the Captain, the girls ‘took the helm’ of the boat. Not much you might say, but when the driver tells you that there wouldn’t be many schools he would let anywhere near his wheelhouse, you know they are exceptional.

This is only one example and staff always talk about this across the school, after trips away - from day excursions to overseas tours. There is something special about Glennie girls and we need to nurture every little bit of this. It does make you proud to be associated with these girls and work in a place that holds on to what is important - well I think so anyway and I am sure that you do, too!

Steve Warren
Head of Junior Years

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